Adaptive planning for climate change

 

In one of the first examples of adaptive planning in New Zealand, the public's being encouraged to get involved in developing a strategy for dealing with the effects of climate change on Southshore and South New Brighton in Christchurch.

The Southshore South New Brighton Regeneration Strategy will identify short, medium and long-term options for adapting to the effects of climate change. It will also consider legacy earthquake issues such as the future of the South New Brighton and Southshore’s former residential red zones.

 Southshore, Christchurch, looking north.  Photo credit: Sam Minnell Photography.

Southshore, Christchurch, looking north.  Photo credit: Sam Minnell Photography.

The strategy will cover the area from Rodney Street, in South New Brighton, all the way down to the end of the Southshore spit. The aim is to have it completed by early 2019.

Regenerate Christchurch, Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury and Ngāi Tahu will all be involved in developing the strategy, in partnership with the community.

"We have an opportunity to develop an adaptive approach to how we manage the effects of climate change - including sea level rise - on these coastal communities,'' says Regenerate Christchurch Chief Executive Ivan Iafeta.

 The dunes need careful consideration in future planning. Photo credit: Simon Makker, Regenerate Christchurch. 

The dunes need careful consideration in future planning. Photo credit: Simon Makker, Regenerate Christchurch. 

"Our goal is to build a shared understanding of the values, opportunities and risks for Southshore and South New Brighton, and the ability and capacity to work together to address them.

"There are approximately 2000 households in South New Brighton and Southshore and we want to ensure they have the opportunity to be involved in these important conversations,'' Mr Iafeta says.

 South New Brighton Beach. Photo credit: Simon Makker, Regenerate Christchurch.

South New Brighton Beach. Photo credit: Simon Makker, Regenerate Christchurch.

A community hub has opened in Estuary Rd where people can find out more about the regeneration strategy process.

“This project is one of the first examples of adaptive planning in New Zealand. Climate change, including sea level rise, could significantly affect many coastal areas, and these conversations about possible options for adaptation and implementation could benefit Canterbury, and even other parts of New Zealand,'' Mr Iafeta says.

 A heron at Southshore. Photo credit: Simon Makker, Regenerate Christchurch. 

A heron at Southshore. Photo credit: Simon Makker, Regenerate Christchurch.